Citizens’ videos capture Syrian turmoil (Al Jazeera)


Arab Americans for Democracy in Syria What is occurring are crimes against humanity. We need everyone who believes in freedom, dignity, and human rights to act now to save the Syrian people. Whether it be going out and demonstrating, writing to your elected representative in your local or federal government, or simply sharing the information online via social media, everyone needs to do their part.

Citizens’ videos capture Syrian turmoil (Al Jazeera)

Massive protests calling for freedom and regime change have spread across Syria since first erupting in the southern city of Deraa a month ago. The demonstrations have continued unabated in spite of a pledge by Bashar al-Assad, the president, on Saturday to implement major reforms and end the 48-year-old emergency law.Syrian security forces and pro-government armed men have responded to the protests with a bloody crackdown, killing hundreds and wounding many more throughout the country. Hundreds of others, including many children, have also been arrested for protesting.The country has been subjected to emergency law since 1963 – the year Hafez Al-Assad, the father of the current president, took power after leading a military coup.

International organisations have described the human rights status in Syria as being one of the worst in the world, with security forces having a long history of harassing and imprisoning rights activists and critics of the government. Protesters are also calling for the release of thousands of political prisoners and dissidents.

Many statues and posters of Hafaz al-Assad and Bashar al-Assad that are ubiquitous throughout Syria have been destroyed or torn down across the country by protesters.

Despite restrictions imposed on the media, many ordinary Syrian citizens have taken it upon themselves to record and post videos of the protests online.

Here are some of the videos.

 April 17

In the city of Tilbisa, Syrian police opened fire on peaceful protesters.

 April 17

Hundreds march in Al-Kaswa, a city near Damascus, Syria‘s capital.

 April 17

A large group gathered in Aleppo, Syria’s second city, criticising the government and calling for “democracy”.

 April 17

Hundreds of ethnic Kurds in Syria call for democracy in solidarity with other Syrian protesters. They hold up signs saying “the Kurdish people and Arab people are brothers”.

 April 17

Thousands mourn the death of a protester in Homs. Many call for the “collapse of the regime”.

 April 16

Thousands march through the streets of Deraa carrying lighted lanterns in an anti-government protest.

Close-up of the protests.

 April 16

Hafez al-assad statue is destroyed in the city of Al-Rastan.

 April 16

Another statue of Hafez al-Assad was destroyed in Deraa.

 April 16

Protesters in Deraa are dressed in long white clothes – with painted words including “freedom” and names of other Syrian cities where there have been killings of protesters.

 April 15

In Damascus, Syria’s capital, thousands of protesters from Harista district merged with protesters marching from Douma district. The videos below are exlusively obtained Al Jazeera material.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/04/201141811535799497.html

In the same protest, demonstrators destroyed a poster of Bashar Al-Assad before marching to the districts of Orbin and then Zamlka.

http://english.aljazeera.net/AJEPlayer/player-licensed-viral.swf

 April 15

Syrian troops beat handcuffed protesters in al-Bayda, near the city of Banias.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/04/201141811535799497.html

 April 3

Syrian police hit an already injured protester with batons before dragging him down the street.

 April 2

Syrian troops killed peaceful protesters in Alsnumein.

 April 1

Pro-government snipers fire on protesters in Deraa.

 March 23

Syrian secret police stop cars in the middle of the street and arrest several people.

 March 20

Syrian plainclothes police attack and arrest a female protester.

Al Jazeera English: Live Stream 

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